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6 Cardinal Job Description Tweaks That Will Bring More Talent to Your Company

If you find yourself in hiring cycles more than you’d like, you know how frustrating it can be. Not being able to retain employees probably signifies that you’re hiring the wrong ones. If people aren’t working out for you, you deserve to find candidates that will. However, the problem doesn’t necessarily relate to bad decisions in the hiring process – it could very well have something to do with your job description. Make sure you’re setting yourself up to draw in the right talent. A well written job description is half the battle.

1. Don’t Ramble

Think about what happens when someone puts a lengthy document in front of you, but you feel as though you have a pretty good idea of what it contains. Do you read the whole thing? Of course not. Your potential candidates are going to do the same thing. Job descriptions aren’t an employee manual – they’re just good insight about who you are as a company and what the job entails. They can find out the rest after you hire them.

2. It Shouldn’t Be Painful to Read

Who wants to work for a cold, detached, and impersonal company? Definitely not a talented employee. You should always be truthful in a job description, but you don’t have to phrase things like they’re orders. Since dry, lifeless descriptions aren’t enticing to anyone, it’s okay to occasionally be fun and highlight unique experiences your company provides.

3. Use the Right Keywords

If someone is looking to apply, they’re going to use Google to find the career they’re interested in. If your job description entirely lacks keywords that a talented employee would be looking for, it’s not likely they’ll find it. Outside of the job title, you’ll need to make sure the description contains enough relevant phrases, or perhaps similar job titles for people who search differently.

4. Add Other Media

Photos and short videos express more than words ever will. These videos should have less to do with the job itself and more to do with the culture of your company. If someone is seeking that position, they already know what it implies. On the other hand, what they do need to know is why they should work for you instead of a competing company that has an opening for the same position. Adding images and videos about your company gives people an idea of what they’re getting into, and they’ll know right off the bat whether or not they’ll thrive in that environment.

5. Only Post Polished Material

If your job description is riddled with typos, inaccurate or outdated information, or things that seem like outright lies, you’re not going to get anywhere. Talented employees aren’t new to the game, and these things will stand out to them immediately. The description needs to reflect your professionalism and standard of quality. If no one has bothered to proofread it, you’re giving a terrible first impression.

6. Make Yourself Stand Out

If you look at job descriptions for similar positions, you’re going to see they often overuse the same tired phrases over and over again. Everyone offers a fast paced environment, and is looking for highly motivated self-starters. Applicants see these terms and roll their eyes. Everyone uses them, and it’s becoming obnoxious. Talented applicants want to see a different attitude.

Writing a better job description involves breaking the mold. Lose the template, drop the redundant tricks and turns of phrase, and offer potential candidates something real. If they have a reason to respect you as an employer before they apply, they’re more likely to remain loyal when bringing their talents to your company. 


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About
Simone Smith is a passionate blogger working at Online Courses Australia. She always promotes a great work-life balance which she considers the key to both private and professional success. In her free time, she enjoys listening to motivational speeches.
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